News

Broadband Availability a Challenge in Rural Areas

By Colin Campbell, NCInsider.com When Donnie Shumate moved to Hyde County several years ago, his wife had to quit her work-from-home job with Amazon because the internet speed was too slow for telecommuting. Shumate is the county’s information technology manager, and he hasn’t been able to persuade internet providers to serve Hyde, which is one of the state’s most rural…

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Hurricane Matthew’s victims still awaiting FEMA grants 18 months after storm

Nearly 18 months after Hurricane Matthew, recovery in the small Wayne County town of Seven Springs has been uneven. Several local businesses are back open and some residents have returned. But across the street from the bustling Mae’s Restaurant, another storefront looks like the Neuse River floodwaters just receded yesterday — the front wall is bashed in and office furniture…


N.C. agencies to review sexual harassment policies

By Lauren Horsch, NCInsider.com As awareness of sexual harassment issues in politics grows, state government agencies are taking a look at their policies to see if they’re comprehensive enough. North Carolina’s Office of State Human Resources has an “unlawful workplace harassment” policy that many state agencies abide by, but some are reaching out to their employees to see if anything…


The Week in Raleigh: Deal Reached on Class-Size Requirements

RALEIGH — The General Assembly has given final approval to a bill designed to ensure new class-size requirements don’t put art, music and physical education specialists out of a job. The governor quickly signed the bill on Thursday. The measure will “put a one-year delay on the class-size restrictions that have been much discussed here and in the media,” said…


The Week in Raleigh: Vetoes Latest Chapter in Power Struggle

RALEIGH — The week in Raleigh closed with Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper vetoing two Republican bills — one that would cut the state appeals court by three members and another that would change the state elections board. The vetoes were received Friday by the General Assembly, where overrides appear likely. Republicans hold veto-proof majorities in the House and Senate and…


The Week in Raleigh: Lawmakers Press Prior to Easter Recess

RALEIGH — Before leaving town for a one-week Easter recess, lawmakers worked longer than typical days on Monday and Tuesday ahead of a looming deadline that will see most proposed legislation die without advancing. That self-imposed deadline — known as the “crossover date” — is the point by which bills not dealing with spending or raising money must pass one…


The Week in Raleigh: New, Smaller UNC Board of Governors Takes Shape

RALEIGH — The Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina will have eight new members and four incumbents for 12 seats, following an election by the legislature that saw more turnover than usual. On Wednesday, the state House elected six members to the board, including two Republican former lawmakers. The next board will remain overwhelmingly Republican and male,…


The Week in Raleigh: Lawmakers Look Ahead to Post-HB2 Task List

RALEIGH — North Carolina ended a year of wrangling over bathrooms and LGBT rights this week in Raleigh as lawmakers passed, and Gov. Roy Cooper signed, a bill rolling back much of the controversial law known as House Bill 2. Although the measure isn’t a complete repeal — lawmakers described it as a “reset” to pre-HB2 times — passing the…


The Week in Raleigh: No Deal as HB-2 Finger-Pointing Continues

RALEIGH — The week in Raleigh saw the one-year anniversary of House Bill 2 come and go with no repeal but with plenty of discussion and a fair share of finger-pointing. House Speaker Tim Moore told reporters on Thursday that Republican leaders in the General Assembly are continuing to talk about the best way to repeal and replace House Bill…


The Week in Raleigh: High Hopes, Nitty-Gritty, and Cooper’s First Veto

RALEIGH, N.C. — The week in Raleigh opened with ceremonial pomp as Gov. Roy Cooper visited the General Assembly to lay out his vision for the state, but closed grounded in the nitty-gritty of competing Republican tax plans and Cooper’s first veto. Cooper on Thursday vetoed a measure that would re-establish partisan elections for local judges. “Judges make tough decisions…